Lorrie Moore, Bark

The stories in Bark, the fourth collection from American writer Lorrie Moore, date back as far as 2003. I don’t know whether that indicates a five-year period of writer’s block—between 1998’s Birds of America and “Debarking” first appearing in the New Yorker—but either way, it’s no accident that the new book opens at the dawn of the Iraq War. Over time, Moore’s fictional muse has started to wander: from people to politics.

This is belated, I know. Blame the queue at the Georgia Straight, if you must. Regardless! I reviewed the new book by Lorrie Moore, who started out as one kind of writer and has lately become a different kind.

Read the whole thing here.

(Also: Someone in the comments says that Moore in fact published “many things” between ‘98 and 2003. Anyone know if this is true for fiction? I found nothing.)

fionastaples

futurerevolutions asked:

What exactly are the approximate races of Alana and Marko? Like it's a fantasy/sci-fi deal so I know they're aliens but, let's be real, I seriously doubt the team would stray from this kind of question since they write a comic like this and the artist is an ~awake~ WoC?????

sagacomic answered:

“This is an original fantasy book with no superheroes, two non-white leads and an opening chapter featuring graphic robot sex. I thought we might be cancelled by our third issue.”

- Brian K. Vaughan (x)

Both Brian and Fiona have repeatedly said that their heroes are PoC. And of course it’s clear from Fiona’s illustrations that neither Alana nor Marko are white, but that Alana has darker skin than Marko.

The only featured/recurring character in the Saga universe who actually seems to have white skin is The Stalk.

However, I still come across white-washed Saga fan art and fancasting posts, which never cease to amaze and infuriate me. No matter how pretty the art, I will never repost that shit.

If people genuinely see these characters as white, they need to check their eyesight or their racism. And I doubt the optometrist will find any deficiencies.

Thanks for the ask. I haven’t had a good rant on this subject in a while!

fionastaples:

benrankel:

Personal pet peeve is folks who think Marko is white. He ain’t.

Marko is meant to be Asian- more specifically, I combined features from a handful of Japanese models and actors when I was designing him. I can see why people sometimes mistake him for white, because I avoided using exaggerated racial markers (slanted eyes, rounded nose, etc). With simple cartoon drawings like these, a lot is left to the reader’s imagination. So I accept there will be some misidentification because I didn’t draw Marko’s family like Mulan characters, haha.

I see Alana as having mixed heritage. When I drew her father I was envisioning an Indian man. Her mother remains a mystery!

image


At this point, getting your own stamp in Canada is hardly an exclusive club. Even Franklin the Turtle has one, and he’s insufferable—not unlike Superman, now that I think about it. But Wolverine? A character so famous that he transformed an unknown actor into the host of the Academy Awards in less than a decade, so iconic he can be identified by a single sound effect (snikt)? Nothing.

I live in Alberta. Wolverine, one of the most famous superheroes of all time, is from Alberta. So why have we never embraced him as our own?
This story, from Swerve magazine, is an idea I’ve had stewing for nearly a year now. So thrilled to finally see it in print.
Read the whole thing here.

At this point, getting your own stamp in Canada is hardly an exclusive club. Even Franklin the Turtle has one, and he’s insufferable—not unlike Superman, now that I think about it. But Wolverine? A character so famous that he transformed an unknown actor into the host of the Academy Awards in less than a decade, so iconic he can be identified by a single sound effect (snikt)? Nothing.

I live in Alberta. Wolverine, one of the most famous superheroes of all time, is from Alberta. So why have we never embraced him as our own?

This story, from Swerve magazine, is an idea I’ve had stewing for nearly a year now. So thrilled to finally see it in print.

Read the whole thing here.

Peter Norman, Emberton

Late in the novel, Lance’s co-conspirator and love interest, a thinly drawn rogue etymologist named Elena, suspects that the building is now forcing the two of them to fall in love. She resists, telling him, “This isn’t how you and I would really end up together. Our story’s not this tacky. Is it?”

My latest review for the Globe and Mail is about murderous dictionary publishers, rogue etymologists, and the unlikely, illiterate employee who tries to bring it all crashing down.

Read the whole thing here.