At this point, getting your own stamp in Canada is hardly an exclusive club. Even Franklin the Turtle has one, and he’s insufferable—not unlike Superman, now that I think about it. But Wolverine? A character so famous that he transformed an unknown actor into the host of the Academy Awards in less than a decade, so iconic he can be identified by a single sound effect (snikt)? Nothing.

I live in Alberta. Wolverine, one of the most famous superheroes of all time, is from Alberta. So why have we never embraced him as our own?
This story, from Swerve magazine, is an idea I’ve had stewing for nearly a year now. So thrilled to finally see it in print.
Read the whole thing here.

At this point, getting your own stamp in Canada is hardly an exclusive club. Even Franklin the Turtle has one, and he’s insufferable—not unlike Superman, now that I think about it. But Wolverine? A character so famous that he transformed an unknown actor into the host of the Academy Awards in less than a decade, so iconic he can be identified by a single sound effect (snikt)? Nothing.

I live in Alberta. Wolverine, one of the most famous superheroes of all time, is from Alberta. So why have we never embraced him as our own?

This story, from Swerve magazine, is an idea I’ve had stewing for nearly a year now. So thrilled to finally see it in print.

Read the whole thing here.

Peter Norman, Emberton

Late in the novel, Lance’s co-conspirator and love interest, a thinly drawn rogue etymologist named Elena, suspects that the building is now forcing the two of them to fall in love. She resists, telling him, “This isn’t how you and I would really end up together. Our story’s not this tacky. Is it?”

My latest review for the Globe and Mail is about murderous dictionary publishers, rogue etymologists, and the unlikely, illiterate employee who tries to bring it all crashing down.

Read the whole thing here.