beatonna
beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.
Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five
Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.
-Kate

Good lord, yes. Fort McMurray is a real difficult place to write about. Should’ve known Kate would knock it out of the park.

beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

Part Five

Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.

-Kate

Good lord, yes. Fort McMurray is a real difficult place to write about. Should’ve known Kate would knock it out of the park.

Anonymous asked:

Why did so many reviewers like Five Star Billionaire? We will be discussing it in our book club next week. I found it tedious and written like a poor self-help book! Ha! Booker nominee, liked by NYT, q the Guardian, Independent, etc. etc. Is the whole thing meant to parody a self-help book? If so, big deal. What think you? I did read your G&M review which wasn't damning enough for my liking. Nan Williamson, Peterborough, ON. Cheers.

Woof. I have no idea. I’ve basically given up on trying to understand those kind of larger aesthetic patterns, to be honest. All I can do is hold my own feet to the fire.

But I agree with you, obviously. Here’s hoping the rest of your book club hated FSB, too.

Interview: Padma Viswanathan, The Ever After of Ashwin Rao

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“I remember that kid blankness,” she says, reached by phone in Toronto. “The information comes, and you have no emotional template into which to fit it. It was as though the bombing made me so aware of the vast realms of human psychology that I had no access to.”

At school, Viswanathan had been intrigued by uprisings such as the Communist Revolution in Russia. “But this seemed so random. So vicious. I couldn’t understand it as a political act, at the time.”

This week’s column is a profile of Padma Viswanathan, whose new novel, The Ever After of Ashwin Rao, takes a hard fictional look at the Air India bombing and the unlikely connections that we make in the wake of tragedy.

I liked talking with her a lot. For one thing, she confirmed the legitimacy of this photo—her parents used to rent paintings from the EPL back when she was a kid. For another, she currently lives not in Toronto or Brooklyn, but Arkansas. Which means she automatically jumps five notches in my books.

Read the whole story here.